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Aftermath of War: Angola in Pictures
by Paul Geoffrey

These photos taken in Angola have come from Action by Churches Together (ACT) based in Geneva. Credit Paul Geoffrey/ACT. ACT is the development and relief arm of the World Council of Churches, supporting its member churches in Angola, including the Congregational Church, the Reformed Church, the United Methodist Church, and the Council of Christian Churches of Angola.

The slides represent some of their work which ACT is supporting, but are included here for their candid and clear insight into life in Angola today as it is affected by the war, the new cease-fire and peace declaration, the staggering humanitarian needs of the people, and peoples' efforts to help themselves.

Click on a thumbnail image to view an enlarged picture.

Click to view larger image. During the war, Angola's capital city of Luanda has swollen to more than three million people, many of them displaced rural families now living in neighborhoods with no public services.
Click to view larger image. With help from ACT, displaced families (like these women in Bundas in Moxico province) are resettling in new communities, working the land and - despite dramatic needs - enjoying peace in Angola.
Click to view larger image. Angola's countryside is littered with the instruments of war. These women are walking past the ruins of an armored personnel carrier on the way to their fields in northern Uige province.
Click to view larger image. The ruins of the village of Kikiala in the province of Uige, abandoned in 1999 after being attacked by UNITA.
Click to view larger image. Three million people have crowded into the capital city of Luanda, fleeing the war in the countryside. Will they go home now that peace is here? A boy in the Luanda neighborhood of Boa Vista.
Click to view larger image. More than 300,000 former UNITA combatants and their families are living in demobilization camps around the country. Food has often run short. In the camp at Uamba, in Uige province, unloading food supplies is a joyful event.
Click to view larger image. Displaced children pay the heaviest price of the war. Here, a malnourished boy gets food in a therapeutic feeding center in Luena run by Medicins Sans Frontieres.
Click to view larger image. A young displaced girl in the village of Muacanhica gets a friendly smile from Guilhermina Chipango, a social worker for LWF/ ACT in Moxico province.
Click to view larger image. A displaced woman in the village of Luchazes in Moxico province.
Click to view larger image. An Angolan woman, displaced for years by fighting in Uige province, brings home material to fix her roof.
Click to view larger image. An Angolan woman, long displaced by the country's long civil war, is now back home in the village of Muapeso, in Moxico province. ACT is helping thousands of women like her to get a new start in peacetime.
Click to view larger image. A displaced boy in Muacanhica, Moxico province, gets a cup of porridge to drink from an ACT-sponsored feeding station for children.
Click to view larger image. Benita Mutanga, a displaced Angolan woman who has resettled in the village of Bundas, is growing food and becoming self-sufficient with help from ACT.
Click to view larger image. Planting onions: A displaced Angolan woman who has resettled in the village of Bundas is growing food and becoming self-sufficient with help from ACT.
Click to view larger image. A young boy in Muacanhica, Moxico province, left homeless by war, survives for now because of the solidarity of people from around the world.
Click to view larger image. Watering hope: A displaced Angolan woman who has resettled in the village of Bundas in Moxico province is growing food and becoming self-sufficient with help from ACT.
Click to view larger image. With water from a well provided by ACT, internally displaced women and their families are surviving in war-torn Angola. This well is in Muacanhica, in Moxico province.
Click to view larger image. Watering hope: A displaced Angolan woman who has resettled in the village of Bundas in Moxico province is growing food and becoming self-sufficient with help from ACT.
Click to view larger image. In remote Moxico province of war-torn eastern Angola, victims of war are getting help from ACT.
Click to view larger image. A once homeless boy draws a house: Children once displaced by war are now settling into new homes in the village of Bundas, in Moxico province, and LWF/ACT is helping insure that they have educational and recreational activities.
Click to view larger image. In the provincial capital of Uige, a displaced girl sells charcoal in the city market.
Click to view larger image. A new day: Sunrise in northern Angola.
Click to view larger image. On the road: The route from Luena to Lucusse in Moxico province, like many roads throughout the country, is littered by the debris of war.
Click to view larger image. Angola's long civil war left the country's infrastructure in a shambles. Here the bridge over the Cassai River in Moxico province was blown up three times by UNITA rebels during the war.
Click to view larger image. In the remote village of Vista Alegre, Uige, a displaced woman has returned home and set about making blocks to build a new home.
Click to view larger image. Feliciana Alfonso came home to Kamasinque with the end of the war in Angola, but found only the charred ruins of what had been her family's home until UNITA forces burned it in 1999, forcing the family to flee. They returned home in July 2002, facing huge obstacles in resuming their life as subsistence farmers. ACT is helping families like them with seeds, agricultural tools, and other assistance.
Click to view larger image. People displaced by Angola's civil war walk along a road near Luena. Like many roads in Angola today, it is littered with the junk of war.
Click to view larger image. A girl displaced by war and living on the outskirts of the provincial capital of Uige grinds cassava flour. She and thousands like her are getting their lives from Action by Churches Together.
Click to view larger image. A wife of a demobilized UNITA combatant in the quartering area at Uamba, near the border with the D.R. of the Congo. ACT is helping thousands of former UNITA families to survive Angola's humanitarian crisis and look for constructive ways to reintegrate themselves into Angolan society.
Click to view larger image. In the provincial capital of Uige, a boy displaced by the violence of the war studies in a class sponsored by the Evangelical Reformed Church of Angola, a member of ACT.
Click to view larger image. A group of amputees - victims of land mines - at a rehabilitation center in Luena run by the Vietnam Veterans of America Foundation. Land mines keep killing and maiming long after the fighting has stopped.
Click to view larger image. Near Luena, a displaced young woman on her way to plant cassava.
Click to view larger image. A displaced man in front of his shelter in Muacanhica, in Moxico province. ACT is present here helping families survive the crisis and make plans for the future.
Click to view larger image. A mother sits with her malnourished son in a therapeutic feeding center in Luena. The displacement of four million people in Angola has left many on the edge of survival.
Click to view larger image. A mother feeds her malnourished son in a therapeutic feeding center in Luena. The displacement of four million people in Angola has left many on the edge of survival.
Click to view larger image. A father helps feed his malnourished daughter in a therapeutic feeding center in Luena. The displacement of four million people in Angola has left many on the edge of survival.
Click to view larger image. A deminer from Norwegian People's Aid sweeps a minefield near Luena, in Moxico province. At least 86,000 Angolans have been maimed or killed by land mines, and although the country is now at peace, the land mines will go on killing for a long time.
Click to view larger image. Two types of anti-personnel land mines (on right), deactivated in a mine field near Luena. On top left, anti-tank mines.
Click to view larger image. An anti-tank mine being carefully dug out of the ground near Luena, in war-torn Moxico province.
Click to view larger image. An Angolan police officer. With Savimbi dead and the war over, will the Angolan government allow civil society and independent media to operate freely?
Click to view larger image. War no more? A UNITA combatant in Lucusse. Will these tens of thousands of men and their families be successfully demobilized and reintegrated back into Angolan society? Aid workers say that immense assistance is needed over coming months to avoid the temptation to return to war or become bandits.
Click to view larger image. A demobilized UNITA combatant and his family in the quartering area at Lucusse, near the Zambian border. Will this family have a future in peace?
Click to view larger image. A boy in Uige gives the sign that life is good in a peaceful Angola.
Click to view larger image. A child on his way to school at the UNITA demobilization camp at Uamba, in northern Uige province. Will the children of UNITA combatants now be free to grow up in peace?
Click to view larger image. The wife of a UNITA combatant in a deemobilization camp at Lucusse in Moxico province. What does her future hold?
Click to view larger image. Along the harbor of Luanda, displaced people search debris for rocks they can sell for gravel. Luanda's population has swollen to more than three million because of the war, many of them desperately poor.
Click to view larger image. A woman grinds cassava in the UNITA demobilization camp at Lucusse, in Moxico province.
Click to view larger image. The Angolan headquarters of ChevronTexaco. In an attack on corruption, church and civil society groups in Angola are demanding that oil companies reveal how much they pay the Angolan government every year.
Click to view larger image. Several independent weeklies have emerged in recent years, but freedom of the press remains restricted in Angola. Will increased press freedom be part of the peace dividend for Angola?
Click to view larger image. A displaced boy in Luanda. The capital city has been swollen by people fleeing the violence in the countryside. Many of them are desperately poor. But will they return home now that peace is at hand?
Click to view larger image. A displaced boy in Luanda. The capital city has been swollen by people fleeing the violence in the countryside. Many of them are desperately poor. But will they return home now that peace is at hand?
Click to view larger image. Demobilized UNITA soldiers in the demobilization camp at Chicala, in eastern Angola, celebrate peace with traditional Ovimbundu dancing and drumming.

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